Skin Health – Part Two

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Calorie restriction diet Research has demonstrated in mice that reducing calorie intake slows down the cellular aging process. This finding could prove to be an anti-aging strategy to test in humans in the future. Scientists found that reducing the number of calories consumed by 35 percent had an impact on aging inside a cell. Cutting calories caused the cell’s protein makers, called ribosomes, to slow down, and the aging process also to decelerate. This decreased speed not only lowered the production of ribosomes, but it also gave them time to repair themselves and keep the entire body functioning well.

Other early research has shown that allantoin — a compound found in many anti-aging face creams — mimics the effect of calorie restriction diets and increases lifespan by more than 20 percent. The elixir of life could be hiding in your bathroom cabinet. Unfortunately, this research has so far only been conducted in worms. It may, however, eventually pave the way for new longevity pathways to explore in humans.

Alcohol. Cutting your intake of alcohol could lower your risk of developing non-melanoma skin cancers. uncovered that higher alcohol intake was associated with a higher risk of developing basal cell carcinoma and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma.

Researchers discovered that for each 10-gram increase in consumption of alcohol per day, the risk of basal cell carcinoma rose by 7 percent and the risk of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma rose by 11 percent. Keep stress in check. Have you ever noticed that right before an important event, an unsightly pimple appears on your face? Well, scientists have identified some links between stress levels and skin problems.

In a study of college students, those who experienced high stress levels were more likely to experience skin issues such as: itchy skin, hair loss, flaky, oily, or waxy patches on the scalp, troublesome sweating, scaly skin, and hand rashes.

Other research showed that teenagers who reported high stress levels were 23 percent more likely to have severe acne. The researchers suspect that stress increases the quantity of sebum, which is the oily substance that blocks pores. This, in turn, leads to greater acne severity. Reducing your stress levels may lead to clearer skin. If you think that stress is having an impact on your skin, try stress reduction techniques such as tai chi, yoga, or meditation. And don’t forget to change your pillowcase! Keep moisture in your skin.

Skin moisturizers keep the top layer of skin cells hydrated and seal in moisture. Moisturizers often contain humectants to attract moisture, occlusive agents to retain moisture in the skin, and emollients to smooth the spaces between skin cells.I recommend the following ways to keep moisture in and prevent dry, red, and itchy skin:

Simple changes can soothe dry skin Following the same skin care routine year-round may not work so well when the humidity drops. Without a change in your skin care, dry air can make fine lines and wrinkles more noticeable. Dry, itchy skin can flake, crack, and even bleed.

To help heal dry skin and prevent its return, I recommend the following.

Stop baths and showers from worsening dry skin. When the humidity drops or your skin feels dry, be sure to: Close the bathroom door. Use warm rather than hot water. Limit your time in the shower or bath to 5 or 10 minutes. Wash with a gentle, fragrance-free cleanser. Apply enough cleanser to remove dirt and oil, avoid using so much that you see a thick lather. Blot your skin gently dry with a towel. Slather on the moisturizer immediately after drying your skin.

I like to add body oil to my moisturizer and then apply to my skin. Quit smoking. Smoking ages facial skin and skin located in other body areas. Smoking narrows the blood vessels found in the outer layer of the skin, which reduces blood flow and exhausts the skin of the nutrients and oxygen it needs to remain healthy. Quitting smoking can improve your skin health and prevent smoking-related wrinkles from forming.

Collagen and elastin give the skin its strength and elasticity. Smoking may reduce the natural elasticity of the skin by causing the breakdown of collagen and reduction of collagen production. Furthermore, the repetitive expressions that are made when smoking — such as pursing the lips — can contribute to wrinkles on the face.

If you currently smoke, the best thing that you can do for your skin health is quit. You can visit Smokefree.gov, an initiative from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), for information about quitting smoking

Getting your beauty sleep. Getting your beauty sleep will banish those dark circles around your eyes and improve your skin tone, and, best of all, it is free.The National Sleep Foundation recommends that adults sleep for between 7 and 9 hours every day. Sleeping for under that amount of time could be detrimental to your health — and your skin, in particular.

Chronic sleep deprivation is known to be linked with obesity, immune deficiency, diabetes, and cancer, but research has shown that sleep quality may also have a significant impact on skin function and aging. People classed as poor sleepers had increased signs of premature skin aging and a decreased ability for their skin to repair itself at night from environmental stressors such as sun exposure.

During deep sleep, your body enters repair mode and regenerates skin, muscles, and blood and brain cells. Without adequate sleep, your body is unable to produce new collagen. Collagen prevents your skin from sagging. Try to get an early night and sleep for a full 7 hours to look your best. Keeping your skin healthy and young does not necessarily mean breaking the bank by purchasing expensive creams and lotions; by following these simple steps, you can make dull and lifeless skin glow.

Thanks for reading,

Susan Chapple

Lead MedSpa Technician and Educator/Instructor

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